Archive for the ‘Newsletter’ Category

Farewell to a Champion for Volunteerism in Oregon

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Governor Victor G. Atiyeh

February 20, 1923 – July 20, 2014

Today we say farewell to Governor Vic Atiyeh, who served as Oregon’s governor from 1979 to 1987.  Atiyeh took several measures to diversify and strengthen Oregon’s timber-dependent economy, including reducing worker’s compensation premiums that were the nation’s highest; streamlining Oregon’s land-use laws; designating the Columbia River Gorge as a national scenic preservation area; and launching a worldwide tourism initiative.  As the nation’s first Arab-American governor, he was also a champion for the rights of minority groups in the state.

What isn’t in his official biography is the visibility and passion he brought to volunteerism.  After running on a volunteer platform, he gave emphasis to this topic in his first inaugural address, saying:

“I ask you to reach out to one another — to give of your time, your talents and your energies. Instead of hiring more policemen, let us work with young people, in church, in youth groups, in athletics, in schools and with the families to give them feelings of self-esteem, achievement and warmth. Instead of buying places of confinement for our elderly and our mentally handicapped, let us give them the help they need to live among us. I ask you to do this not only for others, but for yourselves.”

Soon after coming into office Governor Atiyeh created a Special Task Force on Volunteerism.  Among other recommendations, their report advised him to create the Governor’s Volunteer Awards, which he presented for the first time in 1981, and which we have continued since re-instituting the process in 2006.  Governor Atiyeh is shown here at the 2012 Governor’s Volunteer Awards with Oregon Volunteers Co-Chairs Mike Fieldman and J. Michael Schultz.

We will miss his passion and commitment greatly, and pledge to continue to build on the Blueprint for Volunteerism that was created in 1981 through his vision of a state united by all Oregon residents working together for the common good.

CIA Meeting Topic – Library Services

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

County Library Plans:

Providing retail Library Services to the unincorporated areas of Clackamas County was turned over to designated “Library Cities” when the voters passed the ballot measure that formed the Library District.

Please read on to learn more about the meetings and concerns some voters have.

The LIBRARY CITIES Implementation Plan:

http://www.clackamas.us/bcc/documents/presentation/presentation20140701b.pdf

Current GLADSTONE LEGAL ISSUES being discussed:

http://www.clackamas.us/bcc/documents/presentation/presentation20140708a.pdf

If you want to listen to the BCC discussions on Library Services you can go to http://www.clackamas.us/bcc/   Under the Commissioners photos click on Staff Presentations then click on the July 1 or July 8 Audio button for the date you want to listen to.

If you want to get the Oregonian reporter’s (Molly Harbarger) comments on what is going on read:

http://www.oregonlive.com/milwaukie/index.ssf/2014/07/new_gladstone_library_plan_cou.html#incart_related_stories

Here is some related information you will not find in any of the documents listed above.  The County Library District Advisory Board of Trustees was not asked for their recommendations thus only their concerns are being shared here.  Their ‘concerns’ were presented by Doris Grolbert to the BCC at the July 1st Study Session.  I’m sharing this information just to let you know what the Library District Board is thinking.  Oak Lodge is represented on the Library Board.  You can ask Doris who the person(s) might be.

County Library Advisory Board – Concern No 1

The City of Gladstone has, for years, supported their Library financially but has now discontinued all City support and is relying solely on District support, however, they are still being allocated costs for it which concerns the Library Board.

  • It shows a lack of appreciation or commitment to Library Service to even their own Citizens in Gladstone.

County Library Advisory Board – Concern No 2

The City of Gladstone is not contributing any dollars to the new Gladstone Library.

  • They’re not even setting aside any proceeds from the potential sale of the current property that was purchased for the new Library.
  • They’re not contributing any funds from the current Library location so once the Library moves and they sell that property the money from the sale does not go to the Library District.

All the money’s coming from the unincorporated contribution to the Library District.

  • The million dollars from the County that’s been set aside for Oak Lodge.
  • The million dollars that has been saved in the Oak Lodge budget.
  • They’re also planning to pay back any Library debt with unincorporated dollars.  They’re able to do it because of the extra dollars they get from the unincorporated areas.  This is another red flag from the Library Board which, in their opinion, shows a lack of Gladstone’s commitment and investment in their own Library and the Library Services.

County Library Advisory Board – Concern No 3

Some strings need to be attached to that 2 million dollars.  The board thinks that, considering the track record that Gladstone had with the first million that the County gave them, they would like to see that:

  1. The property is purchased.
  2. The plans and costs are developed and estimated.
  3. The bank funding is secured before any dollars are transferred to Gladstone as this moves forward.

Doris Grolbert is the staff person over all the County Libraries and works directly under Gary Barth, Director of Community and Business Services Department.  You can contact either of them now or in the future as this moves forward.

Doris Grolbert         503/655-8543          (dorisgro@co.clackamas.or.us);

Gary Barth              503/742-4299          (GaryBar@co.clackamas.or.us);

 

 

Clackamas County Chair John Ludlow’s 2014 State of the County Keynote speech

Monday, July 7th, 2014

It is my pleasure to present to you Clackamas County’s 2014 State of the County presentation.

On behalf of my colleagues, Commissioners Jim Bernard, Paul Savas, Martha Schrader and Tootie Smith, it is my honor to share with you the County’s accomplishments during the past year and our vision for the future.

As I’ve said before, we don’t always agree on every issue – nor should we. But each County Commissioner is totally committed to doing the right thing for the people of Clackamas County and for everyone who benefits from the many services this County provides.

I would like to recognize County Administrator Don Krupp who was hired last September.  He just finished heading up his first budget process and is doing an outstanding job.  Unfortunately Don is not with us tonight but I wanted to extend my thanks to Don for his leadership.

We just viewed an informative video highlighting some of the many accomplishments of our County over the past year. I am proud of the work our County employees do every day to benefit our citizens and the public.  They are the backbone of this County.

Credit for those accomplishments must be shared with you, the public we serve.  For without you, there would be no reason for Clackamas County government.

If I had to choose one word to represent my view on the current State of our County, the word would be “optimistic.”

Our local economy is trending upward.

Our County is gradually regaining strength in its recovery from the recession. The rate of unemployment has dropped to near pre-recession levels. New businesses are springing up and public confidence is rising.

So how can we build on this growing momentum?

We can do so by clearly laying out a series of goals or objectives that provide a path to prosperity for our citizens and setting a course to accomplish these goals through a transparent and accountable process.

Earlier this year Commissioners settled on five key areas of focus as part of a comprehensive strategic plan for Clackamas County for the next 5 years.

These goals are:

  • Growing a vibrant economy. Our future prosperity will be built on well-paying jobs that support families, the establishment of affordable housing and promoting capital improvements to grow our workforce.
  • Building a strong infrastructure focused on investment in roads, knowing that investment in this infrastructure will both service existing needs and stimulate business growth.
  • Ensuring safe, healthy and secure communities focused on the well-being of your families and communities.
  • Honoring, utilizing, promoting and investing in our natural resources to promote and preserve the extraordinary economic and recreational opportunities these assets provide.
  • Building public trust through good government.

For each of these areas of focus there are specific, strategic and measureable outcomes.   The County’s budget will be tied to these strategic goals.  A course toward achieving these objectives will be plotted over the next several years.

You will be able to assess and measure these goals through transparent performance measures and online access to our progress.

As we get started on these strategic goals, let’s take a look at how we are doing so far.

Our economy is more vibrant today following the completion of the Clackamas Broadband Express which has provided access to high-speed, low cost broadband connections to public entities and to private businesses. The loop created by this “dark fiber” touches far reaching parts of our county.  This project will enable Clackamas County businesses to develop new markets in the United States and abroad.

Through the diligence of our Economic Development staff and our cooperative partnerships we have added tens of millions of dollars in private sector investment, and added many new businesses to our County.

We are working closely with Metro, Oregon City, the State of Oregon and the new property owner on a plan to explore future development possibilities for the former Blue Heron site which will bring jobs, recreation and many more opportunities to the region.

We now have in place an online searchable database and a system for prioritizing employment lands based on the level of their developmental readiness.  This is aimed at linking potential developers and businesses to shovel ready sites.

We are on our way toward reaching our five year infrastructure goals through projects like the Sunrise System Project, a comprehensive effort, in partnership with the state, to build a new state highway that will enhance and improve transportation connections near the Clackamas Industrial Area, one of the busiest and most critical freight distribution centers in Oregon.

Looking to the future, we are aggressively pushing for expansion of I-205. At times there is almost total gridlock on I-205 between Oregon City and Stafford. That is the only section of the 37 mile freeway that is two lanes in each direction. The viability and accessibility of the I-5/I-205 corridor provides a vital lifeline to industry in the region.

We are also setting as a key goal, the improvement of 120 miles of County roads from “good” to “excellent” status. Approximately 54% of our County roads are rated by industry measure as “fair or poor.”

Perhaps there is no issue facing Clackamas County today that is more important than finding a way to pay for future road maintenance of our 1,400 miles of County roads.  No other county in Oregon is responsible for more paved road miles than Clackamas County.

Property taxes, by law, cannot be used for road maintenance. And the existing sources of road maintenance revenue the County does receive are insufficient to meet our present and future needs.

As a result there is an annual gap of approximately $17 million and it’s growing. During the recently completed budgeting process, the County budget committee allocated $500,000 in precious discretionary dollars to other transportation purposes in order to free up the road fund to use its allocated dollars directly for road maintenance projects.

The County is presently involved in a major effort to educate and engage the public about this important issue.  We have work to do. A recent poll of registered voters in Clackamas County indicated that the public is somewhat aware of our road maintenance needs. But a majority of our Citizens do not yet support new revenue sources needed to solve this problem.

Finding a long-term solution to this problem will continue to be a Commission priority over the next year.

We have a strategic goal to ensure safe, healthy and secure communities.

An important step toward this goal was the opening of A Safe Place on the County’s Red Soils campus in Oregon City.

Working in collaboration with the Sheriff’s office, A Safe Place consolidates services and support for victims and families affected by domestic violence.    We are also seeking to attain full utilization of our County clinics. The County has taken measures to ensure that these clinics, which provide needed medical, dental and mental health services, remain viable.

Targeted goals have also been set to reduce the rate of violent crime, property crimes and to reduce the adult recidivism rate.

Our progress was measured last year by the successful accreditation of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office. This accreditation took years to complete and confirms the high standard of professionalism and the independent verification of best practices.

Congratulations to Sheriff Roberts and all the officers of the sheriff’s office on this prestigious accomplishment.

Our commitment to honor, utilize, promote and invest in our natural resources is an ongoing effort. Last year the sale of timber from county-owned land generated approximately $5 million in revenues.  This money was spent to support the operation of our parks and forest programs.

The County also saved over $1 million by paying off remaining debt on the Stone Creek Golf Course, a county-owned property.  The resulting increased revenue can now be counted on each year to augment our County park programs and operations.

Last year marked completion of the Mt. Scott Creek restoration project, a collaborative effort between Water Environment Services and the North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District.

Through a cooperative effort involving numerous County agencies, we are working to ensure safe and litter-free use of County parks and rivers through tougher enforcement of park rules – including sweeping enforcement of rules regarding alcohol use – and transforming public attitudes on river safety and river health.

Our final, but perhaps most important, goal is building public trust.

The fact of the matter is our best asset as a County is you. We need to invest in winning your confidence and trust.

We have taken steps toward securing that trust by ensuring transparency in our deliberations and our decision-making. This Commission is accessible and accountable to the people through Town Halls, Commissioner Roundtables, Areas of Outreach and evening business meetings where the public is invited to take the time you need to address the Commission and get answers to your questions.

We have put resources into improving our County’s web page and making it easier and more user-friendly to get information.  Look for a roll-out of the new county website later this summer.

Over the next five years our County will be entirely focused on completing outcome-based plans to achieve these strategic goals.  These plans include publicly accessible measurements of our progress.

By the year 2018, 100% of our County budget will be tied to measurable customer results. That is how Clackamas County works for you now and is working for you into the future.

The future of Clackamas County is indeed optimistic. This Commission is here to serve you.

Please tell us what you want and need.

We will continue to work for you and with you to make sure Clackamas County remains the best County in Oregon to live, work and play.

 

Clackamas Fire District #1 to Provide Contracted Fire and Emergency Service to Boring Fire District #59.

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Beginning on July 1, 2014 Clackamas Fire District #1 will begin providing fire suppression and emergency medical services to the citizens of Boring Fire District #59, through a five year contract for service.  The contract for service was unanimously approved by the Clackamas Fire District Board of Directors with a 5-0 vote on Monday May 19th and by the Boring Fire District Board of Directors on May 20th with a 5-0 vote.  The approval of the contract for service is a result of over three years of collaboration between the two agencies in an effort to find efficiencies in the services that are provided to the community.  Components of this contract have been part of an ongoing intergovernmental agreement between the two agencies for the last three years.

Under this contract, Clackamas Fire District #1 will provide fire and emergency services to Boring Fire District #59.  One highlight of this contract for service is the increased level of fire protection and emergency medical services provided to the community of Damascus, which will now include a full time staffed engine company from the Pleasant Valley Community Fire Station and a part time staffed engine company from the Damascus Community Fire Station.  The contract will additionally provide enhanced fire protection services to the communities of Barton, Boring and Eagle Creek.  The contract will be carried out at no additional cost to tax payers from either district and will not affect the services currently provided to residents of Clackamas Fire District #1.

The details of the contract are available for review at www.clackamasfire.com and www.boringfire.com

Clackamas Fire District #1 Background Information

Clackamas Fire District #1 provides fire, rescue, and emergency medical services to Milwaukie, Oregon City, Happy Valley, Johnson City and a portion of Damascus as well as the unincorporated areas of Oak Lodge, Clackamas, Westwood, Carver, Redland, Beavercreek, Carus, Clarkes, and South End/Central Point.

Clackamas Fire has 17 fire stations strategically located throughout Clackamas County with a workforce of more than 200 employees and 100 volunteers. It is the second largest fire protection district in Oregon serving over 179,000 citizens in an area covering nearly 200 square miles.

Boring Fire District #59 Background Information

Boring Fire District #59 protects 64 square miles and nearly 18,000 residents with three community fire stations.  Boring Fire serves the communities of Eagle Creek, Damascus, Barton and Boring with a combination of career and volunteer firefighters.

 

Clackamas County Chair John Ludlow’s 2014 State of the County Keynote speech

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

It is my pleasure to present to you Clackamas County’s 2014 State of the County presentation.

On behalf of my colleagues, Commissioners Jim Bernard, Paul Savas, Martha Schrader and Tootie Smith, it is my honor to share with you the County’s accomplishments during the past year and our vision for the future.

As I’ve said before, we don’t always agree on every issue – nor should we. But each County Commissioner is totally committed to doing the right thing for the people of Clackamas County and for everyone who benefits from the many services this County provides.

I would like to recognize County Administrator Don Krupp who was hired last September.  He just finished heading up his first budget process and is doing an outstanding job.  Unfortunately Don is not with us tonight but I wanted to extend my thanks to Don for his leadership.

We just viewed an informative video highlighting some of the many accomplishments of our County over the past year. I am proud of the work our County employees do every day to benefit our citizens and the public.  They are the backbone of this County.

Credit for those accomplishments must be shared with you, the public we serve.  For without you, there would be no reason for Clackamas County government.

If I had to choose one word to represent my view on the current State of our County, the word would be “optimistic.”

Our local economy is trending upward.

Our County is gradually regaining strength in its recovery from the recession. The rate of unemployment has dropped to near pre-recession levels. New businesses are springing up and public confidence is rising.

So how can we build on this growing momentum?

We can do so by clearly laying out a series of goals or objectives that provide a path to prosperity for our citizens and setting a course to accomplish these goals through a transparent and accountable process.

Earlier this year Commissioners settled on five key areas of focus as part of a comprehensive strategic plan for Clackamas County for the next 5 years.

These goals are:

  • Growing a vibrant economy. Our future prosperity will be built on well-paying jobs that support families, the establishment of affordable housing and promoting capital improvements to grow our workforce.
  • Building a strong infrastructure focused on investment in roads, knowing that investment in this infrastructure will both service existing needs and stimulate business growth.
  • Ensuring safe, healthy and secure communities focused on the well-being of your families and communities.
  • Honoring, utilizing, promoting and investing in our natural resources to promote and preserve the extraordinary economic and recreational opportunities these assets provide.
  • Building public trust through good government.

For each of these areas of focus there are specific, strategic and measureable outcomes.   The County’s budget will be tied to these strategic goals.  A course toward achieving these objectives will be plotted over the next several years.

You will be able to assess and measure these goals through transparent performance measures and online access to our progress.

As we get started on these strategic goals, let’s take a look at how we are doing so far.

Our economy is more vibrant today following the completion of the Clackamas Broadband Express which has provided access to high-speed, low cost broadband connections to public entities and to private businesses. The loop created by this “dark fiber” touches far reaching parts of our county.  This project will enable Clackamas County businesses to develop new markets in the United States and abroad.

Through the diligence of our Economic Development staff and our cooperative partnerships we have added tens of millions of dollars in private sector investment, and added many new businesses to our County.

We are working closely with Metro, Oregon City, the State of Oregon and the new property owner on a plan to explore future development possibilities for the former Blue Heron site which will bring jobs, recreation and many more opportunities to the region.

We now have in place an online searchable database and a system for prioritizing employment lands based on the level of their developmental readiness.  This is aimed at linking potential developers and businesses to shovel ready sites.

We are on our way toward reaching our five year infrastructure goals through projects like the Sunrise System Project, a comprehensive effort, in partnership with the state, to build a new state highway that will enhance and improve transportation connections near the Clackamas Industrial Area, one of the busiest and most critical freight distribution centers in Oregon.

Looking to the future, we are aggressively pushing for expansion of I-205. At times there is almost total gridlock on I-205 between Oregon City and Stafford. That is the only section of the 37 mile freeway that is two lanes in each direction. The viability and accessibility of the I-5/I-205 corridor provides a vital lifeline to industry in the region.

We are also setting as a key goal, the improvement of 120 miles of County roads from “good” to “excellent” status. Approximately 54% of our County roads are rated by industry measure as “fair or poor.”

Perhaps there is no issue facing Clackamas County today that is more important than finding a way to pay for future road maintenance of our 1,400 miles of County roads.  No other county in Oregon is responsible for more paved road miles than Clackamas County.

Property taxes, by law, cannot be used for road maintenance. And the existing sources of road maintenance revenue the County does receive are insufficient to meet our present and future needs.

As a result there is an annual gap of approximately $17 million and it’s growing. During the recently completed budgeting process, the County budget committee allocated $500,000 in precious discretionary dollars to other transportation purposes in order to free up the road fund to use its allocated dollars directly for road maintenance projects.

The County is presently involved in a major effort to educate and engage the public about this important issue.  We have work to do. A recent poll of registered voters in Clackamas County indicated that the public is somewhat aware of our road maintenance needs. But a majority of our Citizens do not yet support new revenue sources needed to solve this problem.

Finding a long-term solution to this problem will continue to be a Commission priority over the next year.

We have a strategic goal to ensure safe, healthy and secure communities.

An important step toward this goal was the opening of A Safe Place on the County’s Red Soils campus in Oregon City.

Working in collaboration with the Sheriff’s office, A Safe Place consolidates services and support for victims and families affected by domestic violence.    We are also seeking to attain full utilization of our County clinics. The County has taken measures to ensure that these clinics, which provide needed medical, dental and mental health services, remain viable.

Targeted goals have also been set to reduce the rate of violent crime, property crimes and to reduce the adult recidivism rate.

Our progress was measured last year by the successful accreditation of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office. This accreditation took years to complete and confirms the high standard of professionalism and the independent verification of best practices.

Congratulations to Sheriff Roberts and all the officers of the sheriff’s office on this prestigious accomplishment.

Our commitment to honor, utilize, promote and invest in our natural resources is an ongoing effort. Last year the sale of timber from county-owned land generated approximately $5 million in revenues.  This money was spent to support the operation of our parks and forest programs.

The County also saved over $1 million by paying off remaining debt on the Stone Creek Golf Course, a county-owned property.  The resulting increased revenue can now be counted on each year to augment our County park programs and operations.

Last year marked completion of the Mt. Scott Creek restoration project, a collaborative effort between Water Environment Services and the North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District.

Through a cooperative effort involving numerous County agencies, we are working to ensure safe and litter-free use of County parks and rivers through tougher enforcement of park rules – including sweeping enforcement of rules regarding alcohol use – and transforming public attitudes on river safety and river health.

Our final, but perhaps most important, goal is building public trust.

The fact of the matter is our best asset as a County is you. We need to invest in winning your confidence and trust.

We have taken steps toward securing that trust by ensuring transparency in our deliberations and our decision-making. This Commission is accessible and accountable to the people through Town Halls, Commissioner Roundtables, Areas of Outreach and evening business meetings where the public is invited to take the time you need to address the Commission and get answers to your questions.

We have put resources into improving our County’s web page and making it easier and more user-friendly to get information.  Look for a roll-out of the new county website later this summer.

Over the next five years our County will be entirely focused on completing outcome-based plans to achieve these strategic goals.  These plans include publicly accessible measurements of our progress.

By the year 2018, 100% of our County budget will be tied to measurable customer results. That is how Clackamas County works for you now and is working for you into the future.

The future of Clackamas County is indeed optimistic. This Commission is here to serve you.

Please tell us what you want and need.

We will continue to work for you and with you to make sure Clackamas County remains the best County in Oregon to live, work and play.

Clackamas County issues statement on lawsuit opposing Oregon City franchise fee

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

Assigning Editors: Clackamas County filed a lawsuit in Clackamas County Circuit Court on Wednesday in an effort to prevent a new Oregon City fee from negatively impacting ratepayers of the Tri-City Service District.  The following statement can be attributed to Clackamas County Administrator Donald Krupp. The County will have no further immediate comment on the matter.

Last November the Oregon City Commission voted to impose a fee on public utilities operating within an Oregon City right of way.  As a result, the Tri-City Service District, which manages the Tri-City Water Pollution Control Plant in Oregon City, is required to pay the city nearly $200,000 to conduct its operations on behalf of three member cities: Gladstone, West Linn, and Oregon City.

Clackamas County believes Oregon City’s fee is excessive and represents an unreasonable burden for customers in the Tri-City Service District.  The county also believes Oregon City’s fee is legally questionable and is pursuing legal action against the city to eliminate or reduce the impact of the fee on district customers.

The Tri-City Service District budget committee has recommended the rate increase necessary to pay for the fee be passed on to Oregon City exclusively, as it does not relate to services provided to the district.

Oregon City had the option of charging a fee based on linear-feet within the city’s right of ways, resulting in about $15,000.  The city is charging the district approximately $191,000 in franchise fees for 2014 and more in future years.

These types of fees are rare, as they increase the cost of basic services, such as water and sewer.  These essential services support critical infrastructure in our region, protecting public health and the environment while promoting economic development.  Some states have banned the imposition of similar fees for this reason.

For more information contact Ryan Johnson, Water Environment Services Community Relations Specialist at 503-742-4561 or rjohnson@clackamas.us.

Children’s Center Medical Director Receives Award

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

Children’s Center Medical Director Dr. Sue Skinner received the Champions for Children Manager or Supervisor Professional of the Year Award at the fifteenth-annual Child Abuse and Family Violence Summit.

This award is presented to a manager or supervisor who supports the overall effort to protect, treat and hold people who harm vulnerable victims accountable. “Dr. Skinner’s expertise and knowledge in the field are well respected in the local area, and in the court system she is considered an expert,” said Sergeant Clint Pierce of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office as he presented the award. “As impressive as that is, the thing that makes Dr. Skinner stand out to the people she works with is her willingness to be available to bring her expertise to bear when and where it is needed. Detectives, District Attorneys, DHS personnel and others all call upon Dr. Skinner for her input or opinions on their cases. Dr. Skinner makes herself available even after hours and on weekends, if necessary.”
The Summit, as it has become known, is hosted by the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office Child Abuse Team and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT). The Summit’s goal is to educate professionals on the complex issues associated with child abuse and family violence, to broaden each professional’s knowledge base in multiple areas, and to increase understanding of the other agencies’ roles and responsibilities. Professionals came to Portland to attend The Summit from around the United States and across the globe.

“Abused children need, and deserve, the best support and intervention services possible,” said Children’s Center Board Chair, Ron Naso.  ”As a board certified pediatrician in child abuse pediatrics, and a member of the American Professional Society of the Abuse of Children, Sue Skinner personifies Children’s Center’s commitment to top-quality child abuse assessment services.”

As Clackamas County’s sole agency providing medical evaluations, forensic interviews and family support services to children who are suspected victims of child abuse and neglect, Children’s Center plays a vital role in ending the trauma of abuse for local children. Children of all ages and socio-economic backgrounds are referred to Children’s Center for suspicion of abuse. To learn more about Children’s Center’s work, visit www.childrenscenter.cc.

Camp Hope Oregon

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

 

Camp HOPE California

Three years ago, CWS brought together the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, the County Division of Children, Youth and Families and several other partners to design A Safe Place Family Justice Center. We opened A Safe Place to the public in December and are thrilled by the success stories already taking place!

 

Now, CWS is working in the same collaborative spirit with the Sheriff’s Office to establish Camp HOPE Oregon! Based off a proven model out of San Diego, Camp Hope Oregon will benefit local children who have either witnessed or experienced domestic violence/sexual assault.  

 

When established, Camp HOPE Oregon will be a high-adventure week designed to help children heal from trauma and have the fun, playful experiences that each of them deserves. 

 

The first step in the process of creating Camp Hope Oregon is to send 20 Oregon kids and six youth mentors to Camp HOPE California this summer. This will provide CWS staff with experience, connect youth mentors with concrete leadership opportunities, and most importantly. . .help instill hope in young survivors. 

 

$10,000 will set 20 children on the path to healing and put CWS on the right track to create Camp Hope Oregon 

 

Bill and Barbara Friesen have chipped in the first $2,500 to get us started – will you join them? A gift of $25 buys the personal camping supplies for one child; that’s something all Northwesterners can appreciate!

 

Thank you for your past support and for continuing to help CWS empower others to live free of domestic violence and sexual assault. 

 

LEGEND ALBERTO SALAZAR LAUNCHES MARATHON TRAINING PROGRAM WITH THE OREGON MARATHON & HALF MARATHON

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

The Oregon Marathon is delighted and honored to partner with Alberto Salazar in announcing the new Salazar Training Program. In addition, Alberto Salazar, three-time winner of the New York City Marathon (1980-82) and 1982 winner of the Boston Marathon, and running coach for 2012 Olympic 10,000 meter gold and silver medalists Mo Farah and Galen Rupp (among other top U.S. and international distance runners), is joining the Oregon Marathon Advisory Board.

Oregon Marathon participants have nearly four months to train for the September 13 race date. Plenty of marathon-training plans are available, and Uberthons is especially pleased that Alberto Salazar is launching his new Salazar Training program in conjunction with the Oregon Marathon and Half. Any major marathon would love to be the first race in which the public has access to Salazar’s training insights.  Mr. Salazar had his choice of marathons to help launch the training program, but his commitment to Oregon led him to the Oregon Marathon. 

Uberthons encourages all Oregon Marathon and Half Marathon participants to register for one of the new programs.  More information about the training program will be available on the Oregon Marathon website.

The plan has two training options:

Interactive Training –  For $59. Training Plans offers a 12 week program for the half marathon and a 16 week program for the marathon. Unlike static training plans in books or on the Internet that simply prescribe a running schedule, Salazar’s training program is interactive and will adjust and adapt based on your actual progress. The initial training program is determined after analysis of responses to a detailed questionnaire. As you upload your actual training times, the program will update and revise (if appropriate) subsequent workouts. Participants will also receive a Powerbar starter pack, a Salazar Training running shirt, and a 15% discount at the Nike Oregon Project online store.

Personal Coaching – For $850. Training Plans offers a 12 week program for the half marathon and a 16 week program for the marathon. Participants receive an individualized program designed by Salazar and assistant coach Pete Julian, with an initial phone/Skype consultation with both coaches, and subsequent 1-on-1 email coaching by Julian. As with the Training Plans, the program is interactive and adaptive. Participants also receive Powerbar products, 2 pairs of Nike running shoes, and a Salazar Training running shirt.

Register now for the Oregon Marathon and Half, and the Alberto Salazar’s Training Plans or Personal Coach.

Trillium Creek Park opens June 14 in Damascus

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

Community members are invited to celebrate the opening of the new Trillium Creek Park from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 14 at the park, 16803 S.E. Anderegg Parkway, Damascus. The free event will include a ribbon cutting, games and crafts for kids, and a barbecue.

The beautiful 1.39-acre neighborhood park in the Anderegg neighborhood was funded through partnerships with North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District (NCPRD), the City of Damascus and the 2006 Metro Natural Areas Bond Measure.

The planning and design process included extensive community involvement. The park was built by T Edge Construction and designed by GreenWorks. NCPRD owns and will maintain the park.

“This was such a successful project because the process included the public every step of the way,” said Damascus Mayor Steve Spinnett.  “It was a win-win for everybody.”

Elements of the park include:

·        Playground with climbing rocks and logs, swings and a play structure

·        Walking path

·        Covered picnic area

·        Basketball court

·        Open play areas     

For more information Contact: Todd Loggan, Communications and Public Involvement Director, City of Damascus, tloggan@damascusoregon.gov; (503) 658-8545

Annie Pierce, Marketing Communications Manager, NCPRD, apierce@clackamas.us; (503) 742-4354

Fiona Gwozdz, Community Relations Specialist, NCPRD, fgwozdz@clackamas.us or (503) 742-4347

www.ncprd.com or www.damascusoregon.gov