Archive for the ‘Newsletter’ Category

Monday, November 24th, 2014

 

To the Community:

On Nov. 4, voters in the college district approved a $90 million bond measure that will pave the way for updating, modernizing and improving college facilities. This bond measure will fulfill business and community members’ expectations for training and education.

Passage of the bond will also enable us to secure $16 million in state matching funds to construct facilities that meet the needs of today’s career technical fields and build a workforce development center at our Harmony Community Campus. We will also raise at least $5 million in private donations to support the bond proceeds.

To those of you who gave of your time and energy to support the bond, I extend a special thank you.

I am thankful that our bond measure received wide support among the leaders in the county, cities, chambers and newspapers in the region. Education and training are important to and valued by all. But most of all, I am thankful to the members of our community for their investment in CCC.

Moving forward, we will work diligently to ensure that CCC uses these resources wisely. We will mark our 50th year of service in less than two years. Because of your support, CCC will be well positioned to serve the community for the next 50 years.

Warm regards,

President Joanne Truesdell
CCC Class of 1982

Wine 30 Opens Milwaukie’s first Parklet

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

Mayor Jeremy Ferguson noted it was the perfect night to cut the ribbon on Milwaukie’s first “parklet,” since Sept. 19 was International Park(ing) Day, a day devoted to providing temporary public open space one parking spot at a time.

A crowd of about 50 people in front of Main Street’s Wine:30 watched Ferguson, Milwaukie Community Development Director Steve Butler and Wine:30 owner Jesse Cannelos put those golden scissors to good use. As Butler explained, a parklet is a temporary patio or deck built for outdoor seating that replaces several parking places in front of a business.

“The goal is to encourage activity and vibrancy” in the downtown area, he said.

The city’s Parklet Pilot Program is “here for two years, and I would like to thank Jesse for having the vision and persistence” to make it happen, Butler added.

Ferguson also thanked Cannelos for “begin such a great business owner; he embraces the spirit of Milwaukie and is an anchor in the community.” Cannelos told the crowd that he would donate $300 to any downtown business owner who wanted to build another parklet.

After they cut the ribbon, officially opening the parklet, guests flooded into the space at 10835 S.E. Main St., admiring the sturdy wooden flooring, tables, chairs, railings, ornamental lighting and planter baskets from Milwaukie Floral.

Milwaukie’s pilot economic-development project to build thriving business districts raised the interest of a handful of downtown business owners, but Cannelos was the first to act. He funded the effort with the help of an online Kickstarter campaign aiming for $7,500, which raised $9,261 through small contributions from individuals.

Farewell to a Champion for Volunteerism in Oregon

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Governor Victor G. Atiyeh

February 20, 1923 – July 20, 2014

Today we say farewell to Governor Vic Atiyeh, who served as Oregon’s governor from 1979 to 1987.  Atiyeh took several measures to diversify and strengthen Oregon’s timber-dependent economy, including reducing worker’s compensation premiums that were the nation’s highest; streamlining Oregon’s land-use laws; designating the Columbia River Gorge as a national scenic preservation area; and launching a worldwide tourism initiative.  As the nation’s first Arab-American governor, he was also a champion for the rights of minority groups in the state.

What isn’t in his official biography is the visibility and passion he brought to volunteerism.  After running on a volunteer platform, he gave emphasis to this topic in his first inaugural address, saying:

“I ask you to reach out to one another — to give of your time, your talents and your energies. Instead of hiring more policemen, let us work with young people, in church, in youth groups, in athletics, in schools and with the families to give them feelings of self-esteem, achievement and warmth. Instead of buying places of confinement for our elderly and our mentally handicapped, let us give them the help they need to live among us. I ask you to do this not only for others, but for yourselves.”

Soon after coming into office Governor Atiyeh created a Special Task Force on Volunteerism.  Among other recommendations, their report advised him to create the Governor’s Volunteer Awards, which he presented for the first time in 1981, and which we have continued since re-instituting the process in 2006.  Governor Atiyeh is shown here at the 2012 Governor’s Volunteer Awards with Oregon Volunteers Co-Chairs Mike Fieldman and J. Michael Schultz.

We will miss his passion and commitment greatly, and pledge to continue to build on the Blueprint for Volunteerism that was created in 1981 through his vision of a state united by all Oregon residents working together for the common good.

Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Transit Project

Monday, May 12th, 2014

The next meeting of the Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Transit Project Citizens Advisory Committee is Thursday, May 15, 2014, from 6 to 7 p.m. The public is invited to attend. The meeting will include updates on safety outreach and on the bus service planning process as it relates to future light rail service.

More

Location: Project East Field Office, 2300 SE Beta St., Milwaukie. 

CLACKAMAS COUNTY’S TOURISM DEVELOPENT COUNCIL SEEKS MEMBERS

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

            Clackamas County’s Tourism Development Council seeks members

The Clackamas County Board of Commissioners is seeking citizens to fill two upcoming vacancies on the Tourism Development Council (TDC). The TDC guides tourism programs funded through the county’s Transient Room Tax. Its members are appointed by the Board of County Commissioners and are authorized to oversee tourism promotion and development in Clackamas County.

Commissioners are looking for applicants who are currently affiliated with a lodging property located within the county. Those with a broad perspective and strong interest in implementing an energized and comprehensive tourism program for The county will be the most desirable candidates.

The TDC is comprised of nine members, appointed to a three year term. Board members represent the diverse population of the county. The TDC meets the second Monday of the month from 2-4 p.m., generally at county headquarters located in Oregon City.

The TDC develops, adopts, and implements, subject to the Board of County Commission’s approval, a Tourism 5-year Master Plan. They also develop an annual Business Plan to address tourism promotion and development, visitor information services, and special events and festivals in Clackamas County as described in the county’s Transient Room Tax Ordinance, approved by voters in 1992. Currently county TRT collections are approximately $4 million annually.

Interested individuals need to complete an application form. Applications may be completed and submitted online via the county’s website at http://www.clackamas.us/miscapp/application.jsp

For an application form in person, contact Clackamas County Public and Government Affairs or at the Public Services Building, 2051 Kaen Road, Oregon City.   The deadline for applications is May 29.

For more information on the marketing and tourism developmentefforts of Clackamas County Tourism and Cultural Affairs, visit MtHoodTerritory.com. 

For more information please contact Janice Nilson at: 503-655-8490 or jnilson@clackamas.us.

Chamber Endorsement 2014 May

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

In the Chamber’s practice of providing guidance to its members, for May’s primary election we focus on three county races: county commissioner, clerk and treasurer.

 After hearing from all the candidates during the Eggs N’ Issues breakfast held on April 10th and during our in depth interviews, we are excited by the overall caliber of the candidates. We found many high-quality candidates, making our deliberations a greater pleasure and a deeper challenge.

 County Clerk

 In a shared endorsement, we believe that either business owners Mark Meek or David Robinson, thanks in part to their military training, problem-solving expertise and effective personalities, would bring to the office discipline, regulation, improved communications and personal connections.

 Mark Meek is a well-connected part of the community and shows that he can handle a complex organization. David Robinson has remarkable credentials, a history of impressive accomplishments and the strategic planning skills needed for the office.

 Treasurer

 Current Treasurer Shari Anderson faces two opponents in her attempt to retain her position she has held since 1999. We are fortunate to have Shari Anderson as the county treasurer and fully support her re-election.


County Commission

 It may be a dream, but we like our politics local and with integrity. We encourage our members to get to know the candidates rather than relying on the broad, irrational and negative advertising brought to our community. Please vote for the person, not the billboard. This approach to winning voters is embarrassing and unfair to our county. It undermines any effort to grow respect for county leadership and direction.

 Position 2: Savas-Bowerman

 We endorse incumbent Paul Savas. Ubiquitous and thorough on the issues, the long-time community activist and small business owner has worked very hard in his first term to represent his constituents and work toward collaborative solutions. We encourage him to develop more creativity in his political approach to the conflicts he faces on the commission.

 Position 5—Bernard-Bates

 A believer in small government, challenger Stephen Bates shows that he has potential. He is earnest, thoughtful, and an advocate for all things Boring. We would like to see him gain experience in larger organizations.

 However, we find no reason not to support incumbent Jim Bernard, given his greater understanding of the practicalities of county governance and the wisdom that comes from years of public service. He has been an integral part of our chamber and this community; and remains active in his support of the chamber agenda.

 

Clackamas County Board approves one-year moratorium on medical marijuana facilities in unincorporated areas

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

 The Clackamas County Board of Commissioners today adopted an ordinance to set a moratorium until May 1, 2015 on the operation of medical marijuana facilities in unincorporated Clackamas County.  The new ordinance goes into effect immediately.

 The proposed ordinance was adopted after the Commissioners heard from a number of residents, some in favor of the moratorium and others opposed, at public hearings April 3 and today. 

 Commissioners said passage of a moratorium now will allow the county to make an informed decision on potential future regulations.

 “I don’t think any of us up here have any doubt that (medical) marijuana does some good for some people,” said Chair John Ludlow. “We will not make a decision on time, place and manner in a vacuum.”

 “I believe this moratorium will provide Clackamas County sufficient time to answer the questions of land use, code violations, community impacts, and legal regulations,” said Commissioner Martha Schrader in a written statement. Schrader was unable to attend because she was representing the county in a meeting with Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber and representatives from a large corporation seeking to invest in this region.

 “I’m going to support a moratorium but I am going to continue in my efforts to put in safeguards for youth. We’re going to move forward in a very thoughtful manner,” said Commissioner Tootie Smith.

 “I want to look deeper into the federal prescription issue,” said Commissioner Paul Savas. “But we can’t do this after the fact – we have to take advantage of this opportunity from the state to approve a moratorium.”

 “It’s important that the county and Sheriff’s Office have a role in whether a facility deserves a license and (approving a moratorium) will give us time to work on that,” said Commissioner Jim Bernard.

 Medical marijuana dispensaries are licensed through the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). At this time OHA has approved three licensed dispensaries in Clackamas County, but the location of those facilities is confidential unless the owner/operator allows the OHA to release the information.  The county has no authority over dispensaries that operate in incorporated areas of the county.

 The ordinance charges the Sheriff’s Office with enforcement of the moratorium.

 The Board acted quickly in response to a new state law that gives local governments the opportunity to impose a moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries up until May 1, 2015, if the ordinance is adopted by May 1. 

 For more information, contact please contact Tim Heider at 503-742-6911 or theider@clackamas.us

Lawnfield Road to be closed April 30 through May 30 for paving

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

Clackamas County is closing the east end of SE Lawnfield Road from 97th Avenue to 98th Court, 24 hours a day from April 30 for as long as 30 days, until May 30, 2014.  The closure is needed for the final paving and striping of the road

 The plan is to have the work completed within two weeks, but extra time may be needed depending on weather conditions.

 The Lawnfield Road / 97th Avenue and Lawnfield Road / 98th Court intersections will remain open throughout construction.  Detour signs will be posted.  The work will be open only to emergency vehicles.

 This closure is the final step in the Lawnfield Phase 3 Construction Project, which included roadway reconstruction and widening, bike lanes, sidewalks, storm water drainage and detention pond, street lighting, and signalization of the Lawnfield Road / 97th Avenue intersection. 

 Project information is available at http://www.clackamas.us/engineering/lawnfieldphase3.html.

 For more information, contact Terry Mungenast at 503.742.4656 or terrymun@clackamas.us

Clackamas County declines to participate in public sector bid to purchase Blue Heron property

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

 Clackamas County will not join with Metro and Oregon City in an effort to outbid a private developer for the former Blue Heron property.

 Clackamas County Commissioners said there was not enough time to fully consider the financial impacts and structure of the bid proposal due by the deadline of 5 p.m. today.  The request to participate came in late Wednesday, April 23rd from Metro staff. 

 “It would normally take 30 to 60 days to negotiate the terms of a deal like this,” said County Administrator Don Krupp.

 The former Blue Heron site, which is located along the Willamette River in downtown Oregon City, was closed in February 2009.  The property has been in bankruptcy for several years. 

Clackamas County, Metro and Oregon City, along with other regional partners, have been working with a consulting firm to develop a concept plan in order to attract developers to the site.  Clackamas County has invested $100,000 towards the visioning process with potential future financial assistance.

 “The County remains committed to the vision for this site and the public partnership that has been working diligently over the last couple of years,” said Commissioner Tootie Smith.  “There just isn’t enough time today to fully examine the commitment we are being asked to make.” 

 A Washington State developer has submitted a $2.3 million offer to purchase the property from the bankruptcy trustee.  An overbid would have to exceed that amount. 

 “Public sector support may be needed to spur redevelopment of the site,” said Commissioner Martha Schrader. “I hope we can continue to work together to develop the right approach.”

 The Willamette Falls Legacy concept plan can be viewed at www.rediscoverthefalls.com.

 For more information please contact Tim Heider at 503-742-5911 or theider@clackamas.us

Clackamas County Board approves one-year moratorium on medical marijuana facilities in unincorporated areas

Friday, April 25th, 2014

The Clackamas County Board of Commissioners today adopted an ordinance to set a moratorium until May 1, 2015 on the operation of medical marijuana facilities in unincorporated Clackamas County.  The new ordinance goes into effect immediately.

The proposed ordinance was adopted after the Commissioners heard from a number of residents, some in favor of the moratorium and others opposed, at public hearings April 3 and today.

Commissioners said passage of a moratorium now will allow the county to make an informed decision on potential future regulations.

“I don’t think any of us up here have any doubt that (medical) marijuana does some good for some people,” said Chair John Ludlow. “We will not make a decision on time, place and manner in a vacuum.”

“I believe this moratorium will provide Clackamas County sufficient time to answer the questions of land use, code violations, community impacts, and legal regulations,” said Commissioner Martha Schrader in a written statement. Schrader was unable to attend because she was representing the county in a meeting with Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber and representatives from a large corporation seeking to invest in this region.

“I’m going to support a moratorium but I am going to continue in my efforts to put in safeguards for youth. We’re going to move forward in a very thoughtful manner,” said Commissioner Tootie Smith.

“I want to look deeper into the federal prescription issue,” said Commissioner Paul Savas. “But we can’t do this after the fact – we have to take advantage of this opportunity from the state to approve a moratorium.”

“It’s important that the county and Sheriff’s Office have a role in whether a facility deserves a license and (approving a moratorium) will give us time to work on that,” said Commissioner Jim Bernard.

Medical marijuana dispensaries are licensed through the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). At this time OHA has approved three licensed dispensaries in Clackamas County, but the location of those facilities is confidential unless the owner/operator allows the OHA to release the information.  The county has no authority over dispensaries that operate in incorporated areas of the county.

The ordinance charges the Sheriff’s Office with enforcement of the moratorium.

The Board acted quickly in response to a new state law that gives local governments the opportunity to impose a moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries up until May 1, 2015, if the ordinance is adopted by May 1.

For more information, contact please contact Tim Heider at 503-742-6911 or theider@clackamas.us